Playfulness
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Playfulness
“We are never more fully alive, more completely ourselves, more deeply engrossed in anything, than when we are at PLAY.”
― Charles Schaefer
Curated by Dr. Amy Fuller
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» The Peacable Home: Cooperative Games

» The Peacable Home: Cooperative Games | Playfulness | Scoop.it

Then I discovered cooperative games.  As the name suggests cooperative games involve all the players working together to achieve an end goal, supporting each other, working as a team and hopefully bonding in the process.  The games themselves have a built in ‘opposition’ which might be racing against the night or the weather, but the participants themselves must all work cohesively in order to be successful and ‘win’.

These games have been a huge blessing in our house, giving us hours of co-operative fun and underscoring the values I hope to instill in my boys; kindness, cooperation and teamwork.  Rather than rejoicing in each other’s failures we can only be successful if we work as a team, just like in real life!

Dr. Amy Fuller's insight:

Cooperation is so much better for our brains than competition!

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Spirituality & Practice: E-Courses: Practicing Spirituality through Creativity

Spirituality & Practice: E-Courses: Practicing Spirituality through Creativity | Playfulness | Scoop.it
A 40-part email course for those who want to discover and express their creativity through spiritual practices.
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Rescooped by Dr. Amy Fuller from Mental Health & Creativity
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Eric Maisel on meaning in art to manage depression | TalentDevelop

Eric Maisel on meaning in art to manage depression | TalentDevelop | Playfulness | Scoop.it

Eric Maisel: “When we fear that we do not matter or that our efforts do not matter, we get depressed.

“Similarly, the places where we make large investments of meaning, for instance in our performances, paintings, or books, are places of great anxiety, because there is more than our ego on the line, there is our very sense of the meaningfulness of our life.

“If the world is not interested in our paintings, for instance, we will be hard-pressed to maintain meaning there; so, when we come to the blank canvas, we can already be a little (or a lot) frightened that a negative reaction to this as-yet-unborn painting will precipitate a meaning crisis.”


Via Douglas Eby
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Julianna Bonola's curator insight, July 3, 2013 2:59 AM

unread at the ninent

Rescooped by Dr. Amy Fuller from Creative arts for therapy
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How Art Can Be Used To Enhance Your Mind

How Art Can Be Used To Enhance Your Mind | Playfulness | Scoop.it

"Music, dance, painting and other forms of art have shown to have an incredibly significant and positive effect on both children and adults. Art therapy has been used to awaken the senses of underprivileged children through both the viewing and creating of art.Through their artistic endeavors, they subconsciously associate themselves with their past. The memories come more freely since they are not elicited by direct objects, but indirect thought instead. Due to many past experiences many children begin to develop nervousness, anxiety, sleeping excessive or too little, a lack of verbal, social and language skills. Many times depending on the color within a piece, or may be some other quality of the artwork, different emotions can be evoked by the observer unknowingly. Awakening of the senses through experimentation with the different types of art these children experience an untapped emotional world within themselves and with this association with their own inner being, they are able to show increased abilities in their cognitive, motor and social skills." | via Edudemic


Via Todd Reimer, Jen Thompson
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How Einstein Thought: Fostering Combinatorial Creativity and Unconscious Connections

How Einstein Thought: Fostering Combinatorial Creativity and Unconscious Connections | Playfulness | Scoop.it

by Maria Popova

 

"For as long as I can remember — and certainly long before I had the term for it — I’ve believed that creativity is combinatorial: Alive and awake to the world, we amass a collection of cross-disciplinary building blocks — knowledge, memories, bits of information, sparks of inspiration, and other existing ideas — that we then combine and recombine, mostly unconsciously, into something “new.” 

 

"The concept, in fact, was perhaps best explained by Albert Einstein, who termed it “combinatory play.” (Einstein famously came up with some of his best scientific ideas during his violin breaks.) From his Ideas and Opinions (public library) — the same invaluable volume that gave us the beloved physicist’s timeless wisdom on kindness and our shared existence — comes Einstein’s single most succinct articulation of how his mind works, driven by this powerful combinatorial creativity. 

 


Via Jim Lerman
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Creativity - Scott Barry Kaufman

Creativity - Scott Barry Kaufman | Playfulness | Scoop.it

Excerpt from video on creativity by cognitive psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman.


Via Douglas Eby
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Douglas Eby's curator insight, July 13, 2013 4:21 PM

For more from Scott Barry Kaufman related to his new book “Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined” see my post Don’t You Have To Be “Gifted and Talented” To Be Creative?

http://blogs.psychcentral.com/creative-mind/2013/07/dont-you-have-to-be-gifted-and-talented-to-be-creative/

Rescooped by Dr. Amy Fuller from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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The Power of the Creative Arts

The Power of the Creative Arts | Playfulness | Scoop.it

A recent analysis of past studies highlights the health benefits of music, dance, and art therapy.

 

On the whole, people with cancer who were assigned to creative arts treatments reported less depression, anxiety, and pain and a better quality of life during the programs than those who were put on a wait list or continued receiving usual care. For example, in one 2010 study, listening to half an hour of familiar music cut reported pain levels at least in half for 42 percent of hospitalized patients, while just eight percent of those in a comparison group saw relief.


Via Pamir Kiciman
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Jeff Hairston's curator insight, October 7, 2013 3:21 AM

I've experienced significant healing via artistic creativity.

It works.